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Nursing Home Elopement Lawyer

Elopement is a term used to describe when a resident leaves a nursing home without authorization or supervision. It is a severe issue that can lead to injury or even death, and it is the responsibility of nursing home staff to prevent it from happening. However, if your loved one has eloped from a nursing home, you may need to consider hiring a nursing home elopement lawyer.

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Call us at (866) 907-1145 24/7 to arrange to speak with a personal injury lawyer about your case, or contact us through the website today.

What is a Nursing Home Elopement Lawyer?

A nursing home elopement lawyer is an elder law attorney representing families of nursing home residents who have eloped- which is wondering off the premise. We are experienced in navigating the complex legal system and can help you understand your legal rights and options.

Why Hire a Nursing Home Elopement Lawyer?

You may want to hire a nursing home elopement lawyer for several reasons. First, we can help you determine if the assisted living facility was negligent in its duty to prevent elopement. Nursing home facilities have a duty to provide a safe environment for their residents. If nursing home neglect is found, you may be entitled to compensation for any injuries or damages you or your loved one suffered due to elopement. You can get that compensation by filing a nursing home abuse lawsuit and receiving a settlement.

Second, an experienced nursing home elopement lawyer can help you navigate the legal system and ensure your case is properly documented and filed. Nursing home elopement is one of the different types of nursing home abuse and neglect. This can be complex and time-consuming; having one of our experienced lawyers for nursing home abuse by your side can make all the difference.

Who Can You Sue for Nursing Home Elopement?

Nursing Home Elopement Lawyer

The assisted living facility is responsible for the safety and well-being of its elderly residents. If an elderly resident elopes from the facility, it is the long-term care facility's responsibility to ensure that they are found and brought back safely. If they fail to do so, they can be held liable for any harm that comes to the nursing home patient.

Here are some parties that you can sue for nursing home elopement:

The Nursing Home

The nursing home is the primary party that can be sued for elopement. They have a duty of care to their residents, and if they fail to provide adequate supervision or security, they can be held responsible for any harm to the resident.

Nursing Home Staff Members

The staff of the nursing home can also be held responsible for elopement. If they were negligent in their duties by not supervising the resident or not following the facility's security protocols, they can be sued for their negligence.

The Owner of the Nursing Home

The owner of the North Carolina nursing home can also be sued for elopement. They have a responsibility to ensure that their facility is safe and secure, and if they fail to do so, they can be held liable for any harm that comes to the resident.

Third-Party Contractors

If the nursing home hired third-party contractors to provide security or other services, they can also be held responsible for elopement. If the contractors were negligent in their duties, they could be sued for harm to the resident.

Elopement is a severe issue that can lead to harm or even death of nursing home residents. You can sue the parties responsible for their negligence if your loved one has suffered from elopement. The nursing home, staff, owner, and third-party contractors can all be held liable for any harm to the resident. It's essential to consult a lawyer to determine the best action for your situation.

What to Look for in a Nursing Home Elopement Lawyer?

When looking for a nursing home elopement lawyer, choosing someone with experience in this area of law is essential. Look for a lawyer with a track record of success representing families of nursing home residents who have eloped.

You should also choose a compassionate and understanding medical negligence lawyer who will work tirelessly to ensure you and your loved one get the justice and compensation you deserve.

How Much Does a Nursing Home Elopement Lawyer Cost?

We work on a contingency basis for wrongful. A contingency fee basis means we do not charge you anything unless we win a settlement in or out of court. This fee structure ensures we work hard for your case and that you don't have even more out-of-pocket expenses during a stressful time. We also offer contingency fee schedules for other practice areas, such as:

What Are The Different Types of Elopement in Nursing Homes?

Elopement is a severe concern in long-term care facilities, especially for residents with dementia or other cognitive impairments. Elopement refers to the act of leaving a nursing home without permission or supervision. There are different types of elopement, each with its own risks and challenges. In this article, we’ll explore the different types of elopement in nursing homes and how they can be prevented.

1. Wandering Elopement

Wandering elopement occurs when a resident walks around the nursing home unsupervised and eventually leaves the premises. This type of elopement is common among residents with dementia, who may become disoriented and confused. Nursing homes can implement security measures such as alarms, locks, and monitoring systems to prevent wandering elopement. Staff can also provide activities and engagement to keep residents occupied and prevent them from wandering.

2. Bolting Elopement

Bolting elopement occurs when a resident suddenly runs or bolts out of a nursing home. This type of elopement is often due to a sudden impulse or agitation. Nursing homes can prevent bolting elopement by identifying residents who are at risk and providing them with one-on-one supervision or a secure environment. Staff can also use calming techniques and behavior management strategies to reduce agitation and impulsivity.

3. Planned Elopement

Planned elopement occurs when a resident intentionally leaves a nursing home without permission or supervision. This elopement is often due to dissatisfaction with the nursing home environment or a desire for independence. Nursing homes can prevent planned elopement by addressing residents’ concerns and needs, providing meaningful activities and engagement, and monitoring residents’ behavior for signs of dissatisfaction or restlessness.

4. Accidental Elopement

Accidental elopement occurs when a resident leaves a nursing home facility without realizing they are doing so or intending to do so. This type of elopement is often due to confusion or memory loss. Nursing homes can prevent accidental elopement by providing clear signage and wayfinding, monitoring residents’ movements, and providing supervision and support for residents who are at risk.

In conclusion, elopement is a severe concern in nursing homes, and different types require different prevention strategies. By understanding the different types of elopement and implementing appropriate prevention measures, the nursing homes can ensure their residents' safety and well-being.

The Dangers of Nursing Home Elopement

Nursing home residents who elope are at risk of encountering a range of hazards. These may include:

Physical Injuries

Residents who are disoriented or confused may wander into unsafe areas, such as:

  • busy streets
  • construction sites
  • or bodies of water.

This can result in accidents, falls, or other injuries.

Exposure to the Elements

Residents who elope may be exposed to extreme weather conditions, such as heat, cold, rain, or snow. This can lead to hypothermia, dehydration, or other health issues.

Getting lost

Residents who wander outside of the nursing home may become lost and disoriented, which can cause them to become more anxious and confused.

Abduction

Elderly residents who are lost and confused may be more vulnerable to being taken advantage of or abducted by strangers.

Death

Should a loved one die from elopement in a nursing home, you may have a wrongful death case.

How To Prevent Nursing Home Elopement in North Carolina

Nursing home elopement is a severe issue that can put the safety of elderly residents at risk. In North Carolina, nursing home residents have been wandering off unsupervised and getting lost or injured. If you have a loved one living in a nursing home, taking steps to prevent elopement is essential. Here are some tips on how to do that:

Assess the Risk for Elopement

Before taking steps to prevent elopement, you need to assess the risk for elopement. Some residents may have a higher elopement risk depending on their cognitive and physical abilities.

Secure the Environment

One of the most effective ways to prevent elopement is to secure the environment. This means ensuring that doors, windows, and other potential exits are locked or secured with alarms or sensors. Nursing homes should also have a system in place to monitor residents' movements and alert staff if someone tries to leave without supervision.

Provide Adequate Supervision

The best way to prevent elopement is to provide adequate supervision for residents who are at risk. This may involve assigning a dedicated staff member to monitor certain residents or providing more frequent check-ins and room checks. Nursing homes should also have a system in place to track residents' whereabouts and ensure that they are accounted for at all times.

Provide Engaging Activities

Residents who are prone to wandering may be more likely to do so if they are bored or restless. Providing engaging activities and social opportunities can help reduce the risk of elopement by keeping residents occupied and stimulated. This may include group outings, games, crafts, and other activities that appeal to residents' interests and abilities.

Educate Staff and Family Members

Preventing elopement requires a team effort, and everyone involved in a resident's care should be aware of the risks and how to prevent them. Nursing home staff should receive training on elopement prevention and be familiar with the facility's policies and procedures. Family members should also be informed of the risks and encouraged to participate in monitoring and supervision efforts.

Contact The Law Offices of John M. McCabe

Nursing home elopement is a serious issue that requires proactive measures to prevent. By assessing the risk, securing the environment, providing adequate supervision, offering engaging activities, and educating staff and family members, you can help keep your loved one safe and secure in their nursing home.

FREE Consultations

Call us at (866) 907-1145 24/7 to arrange to speak with a personal injury lawyer about your case, or contact us through the website today.
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